Sunday, July 20, 2014

Announcing the Release of my 2nd Book "Modern Small Stakes"

Modern Small Stakes release
Finally!

Well, it is nearly 7 months now after the promised release date but I am extremely happy to officially announce the release of my 2nd book, "Modern Small Stakes." This is indeed the long promised "CTM2." I chose to go with a completely different title because this is a completely different book. Modern Small Stakes focuses on higher limits (NL10-NL100) than Crushing the Microstakes (NL2-NL5). It is also far more advanced in theory and depth on every level. This book was infinitely harder to write and turned out to be double the length of its predecessor at over 500 pages.

When I first started to work on Modern Small Stakes about a year and a half ago I set a goal to write the best book ever written on these limits. I really felt (and still do) that the literature out there is really lacking at these stakes especially regarding today's games.

In retrospect this goal of mine was  probably a bit foolish because it made me demand perfectionism at every corner and ensured countless revisions and alterations of the text. It also made the length of the book far greater than I had originally planned. I felt that this was necessary though in order to get across everything that I wanted to say about these stakes.

These are two of the main reasons why it took so long for me to release this book. I sincerely apologize to all of those who have been waiting for months on end and asking for updates. On the bright side, I am confident that I accomplished my goal.

I believe that Modern Small Stakes will be a game-changer in the poker world for full ring and 6max small stakes NLHE cash games. It covers every aspect of the game at these limits in extensive detail from HUD setup, player type analysis, game selection, 3Betting, 4Betting, 5Betting, balancing your range, CBetting frequencies, barreling frequencies, bluffing frequencies, intentionally tilting other regs and so much more. With over 100 highly detailed examples involving real opponents and real situations at these stakes, every effort was made to explain how to translate the theory into practice.



Table of Contents 

Before I say anything else about the book let me post the table of contents so that you can get a better idea of what is included. The table of contents is featured below in the official Youtube release video for Modern Small Stakes.



Individual screenshots of all 14 pages of the table of contents are also listed below. 
(Click to Enlarge)


















The heart of Modern Small Stakes is teaching how to break down your opponent at these limits to the finest detail. This is why there is extensive discussion of effective HUD use throughout this book. In MSS I also assume that your opponents are reasonably good thinking regulars 95% of the time. Therefore, issues of balancing your range in all situations play a heavy role as well.

Whereas CTM consisted of a playbook macro type approach to exploiting the terrible players who populate the very lowest stakes, MSS is about micro managing versus fairly good players. What becomes evident to the reader early on in the book is that all players at these stakes really do have fairly significant leaks. They just aren't as readily noticeable as they are with the massive donkeys who dominate every table at the lowest limits.

This is why Modern Small Stakes is extremely example heavy (102 of them to be exact and roughly 50% 6max and 50% full ring). As you move up the stakes success becomes more and more about throwing the "standard play" out the window at times and finding the line that yields the highest EV for this particular opponent, in this particular situation. Therefore, there are a lot of outside the box, "advanced" or "fancy plays" suggested in this book. But they are always made for the right reasons.

My hope once again with Modern Small Stakes is that it takes your game to the next level. More precisely, that it improves your bottom line at the tables. This is why you will find the same linear and practical approach in this book as you did in CTM. There is a vast amount of information presented in this book which covers every aspect of the game. Modern Small Stakes is by no means a casual read. It was created for people who take this game very seriously and are ready to put in the hard hours studying its contents and then applying it at the tables.

I want to thank everyone who supported me here on my blog, via email, on DTB, Facebook, Twitter and many other places throughout this (frankly insane) project. You helped me during the countless times in the past year when I didn't know if I would ever be able to finish this book.

Modern Small Stakes is massive and comprehensive. It was meant to be the "be all end all" definitive guide for these limits. It was absolutely the hardest thing that I have ever done in my life. I am finally satisfied with it now though. I hope you are too.


Screenshots
(Click to Enlarge)








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Please send $29.95 to blackrain79@dragthebar.com and then send me an email with your Skrill email address. I will reply with your copy of Modern Small Stakes attached ASAP.

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Modern Small Stakes Technical Details
  • Please be aware that Modern Small Stakes is only available in the PDF format right now. One of my first priorities will be to start working on the Kindle and iPad versions of the book. Just like before with CTM, when these are released they will be made available free of charge to all previous buyers.
  • Bonus materials that are likely to be released alongside Modern Small Stakes in the coming months will also be made available to all previous buyers at no cost.
Please leave a comment below or send me an email at blackrain79@dragthebar.com
if you have any questions about Modern Small Stakes.

Pages: 500
Word Count: 81,263
Copyright © 2014 by Nathan Williams

Saturday, July 5, 2014

The Difference Between Zoom and Regular Poker Tables

One of the most common questions that I get asked about is the adjustments that need to be made for Zoom on Pokerstars. I also see this all the time on poker forums with some people even wondering when somebody is going to write a book on the topic. Well, it won't be me that writes it. That much I can assure you! I am pretty sure that nobody else will either though.

The reason why is because the strategic differences between Zoom and the regular games just aren't large enough to warrant it. Pokerstars has done a great job marketing Zoom and it is still wildly popular with recreational players and grinders alike over two years since its release in May of 2012. However, at the end of the day it is still just the same game of poker. There are a couple of key differences between Zoom and regular poker games though that I will go into here.

Speed

The most obvious difference that anyone will notice right away is the speed of Zoom when compared to a regular table. Because of the fast fold button (which allows you to simply fold hands that you don't want to play instead of waiting for the action to be on you) Zoom tables deal somewhere in the neighbourhood of 4 times as many hands per hour as a regular table. Or if you are a live player it might be 10 or 12 times as fast as you are used to. 

Obviously this doesn't change anything about the actual game. It just speeds up the action considerably and allows you to get to the interesting hands that you want to play a lot faster. It is a brilliant idea and obviously great for grinders because they can get an incredible amount of hands in.

It is also great for recreational players because they don't have to wait for some 24 tabler who is timing out on a simple preflop decision. They don't even have to wait to get dealt in. They can sit down and start splashing the virtual chips around immediately which is exactly what they want. 

Lack of Information

The second most obvious difference with regards to Zoom is the big lack of information. With player pools on Pokerstars regularly in the hundreds of people at the micro and small stake levels you might only see the same person once every 20 hands or so. It is obviously therefore a lot harder to build up a reasonable sample on someone when compared to the regular tables where you collect data on them every single hand. 

This creates a different dynamic to the game. You can't take a sophisticated line against a reg based off of a mountain of data that you have collected on him. However it is also a two way street. They don't have much information on you either. In a way it is more like "real poker" as some live players might argue. But the important point is that you simply have to play more ABC by the book poker in many situations due to this lack of information. 

This isn't always a bad thing. I have discussed many ways to abuse this information gap in my DragTheBar Zoom videos by simply getting more aggressive than normal in a lot of common spots. Most of the mass multi-tabling nits won't have much information on you and they will just "wait for a better spot." 

Lack of Table Selection

Lastly (and this is the real kicker for a lot of people including me) is that in Zoom you are stuck with the pool that you are in. You can't really table select and you certainly can't seat select at all. This is why winrates will simply always be higher in the regular games. 

I would actually argue that the fish play better in Zoom games as well because of the fact that they can just fast fold their way to a reasonably good hand. One of the main reasons that they play so many ridiculous hands in the regular games and in live games as well is because they get bored and don't want to wait. 

The Verdict

So in closing you can probably already guess which games that I prefer to play in. I am not much of a big time rakeback grinder anymore though so 8 tabling Zoom for the next milestone bonus doesn't interest me very much. I am more interested in maintaining a higher winrate by chasing fish around and also being able to get position on them every single hand. This is more or less the whole point of the game in my opinion - consistently playing with much weaker players.  

With that said, at the very lowest limits (NL2 and NL5) I don't think it really matters which games you play in, Zoom or regular. There are huge whales and terrible regs everywhere (yes even in 2014). The games get pretty reg infested at higher limits though. Most people are grinding out very small winrates.

I think that overall Zoom is a very good thing for poker as it is a new and exciting take on the game for many recreational players. It is also a marketing dream for Pokerstars. And it is also great if you are a prolific rakeback grinder. 

Listen, at the end of the day if you love playing Zoom then keep playing it, don't listen to me. The Zoom games are not massively harder than the regular tables. And what they might lose in terms of game quality they certainly make up for in terms of fun. However, if maximizing your winrate and moving up quickly are your goals in poker, then I would suggest that the regular tables are probably a better bet for you. 

If you found this article useful please share it with your friends on Facebook and Twitter below!

Go ahead and share your experiences with Zoom or the regular poker tables in the comments below as well.
Nathan Williams aka "BlackRain79" is a poker player, coach, DragTheBar instructor and the author of Crushing the Microstakes and Modern Small Stakes.

Friday, June 6, 2014

Good Win Rates For Micro and Small Stakes Online Poker Cash Games

I get asked about win rates perhaps more than any other topic. That or how many hours do they need to play to make $50 a day. You see these questions all the time on poker forums as well. They usually come from people who are new to online poker. I often reply with something along the lines of it depends on your skill level, the stakes and the volume that you put in. It is totally impossible for me to answer this question without this information.

Also, I take the time to remind them (or perhaps inform) that they are thinking about the game all wrong. Poker is not like a regular job where if you show up for X amount of hours you get paid X amount of money. Most people lose in the long run in this game in fact. In other words they go to "work" and their paycheck is a negative amount.

Show Me The Money!

Anyways, while these types of questions do seem really silly to me, I have gotten enough of them by now to know that people want to know about win rates no matter what. So let's get into it! Now the question always gets phrased to me as "what is possible." So let's start there.

In my opinion the top 5% of the entire player pool are the ones who are the long term big winners. These are the guys who are doing "what is possible." So that is who I am speaking about below. Also, I will be assuming that they are religiously game selecting (both table selection and seat selection) when they have the time for it. Elite players tend to always be doing this anyways.

Now of course the big thing with game selection is that when you are playing 18 tables at once you simply do not have anywhere near as much time to pay attention to it as someone who is 6 tabling for instance. The same goes for the quality of your actual poker decisions. This will drastically affect your potential win rate. So I will break down the win rates below into three different volume categories.

Lastly, what follows is just my opinion from playing at all levels of the micros and small stakes for years. If you fail to achieve these numbers (or have already surpassed them) please don't send me hate mail!

Top win rates possible for elite players who play 1-8 tables.

NL2: 30bb/100
NL5: 20bb/100
NL10: 15bb/100
NL25: 12bb/100
NL50: 10bb/100
NL100: 8bb/100

Top win rates possible for elite players who play 9-17 tables.

NL2: 20bb/100
NL5: 13bb/100
NL10: 10bb/100
NL25: 8bb/100
NL50: 7bb/100
NL100: 6bb/100

Top win rates possible for elite players who play 18+ tables.

NL2: 12bb/100
NL5: 8bb/100
NL10: 6bb/100
NL25: 5bb/100
NL50: 5bb/100
NL100: 4bb/100

So there you have it! You can multiply these amounts by your projected daily volume to find out what the best possible average earnings per day are at your limit. You can also multiply them by your average hourly volume in order to find out what the best possible average hourly is at your limit. This is all pre-rakeback of course as well which can add up to thousands of dollars per month for high volume players at NL25 and higher.

The Let Down

Alright, let's inject some reality into this conversation now. The average win rate and daily earnings of a random person just getting started in online poker are both in fact negative numbers. Many people get caught up in the spell of the dream poker lifestyle. They have seen the millions being tossed around on TV and they figure that since they dominate their buddies every Friday night or have "been killing it" at the local 1/2 game for an inconsequential amount of hands that online poker is their's for the taking.

The vast majority of them find out the hard way that it doesn't quite work like that. Let me now list the win rates that are much more common for these stakes. Keep in mind that at least 3/4 of people who play poker actually lose in the long run. So these numbers represent the average win rate that a winning player (only 1/4 of the player pool) can expect to attain at the various stakes.

These are the average win rates for 1-8 tables.

NL2: 10bb/100
NL5: 6bb/100
NL10: 4bb/100
NL25: 3bb/100
NL50: 2bb/100
NL100: 2bb/100

These are the average win rates for 9-17 tables.

NL2: 6bb/100
NL5: 4bb/100
NL10: 3bb/100
NL25: 2bb/100
NL50: 1bb/100
NL100: 1bb/100

These are the average win rates for 18+ tables.

NL2: 4bb/100
NL5: 2bb/100
NL10: 2bb/100
NL25: 1bb/100
NL50: 0.5bb/100
NL100: 0.5bb/100

You can pull out your calculator again and multiply these numbers by your projected daily volume and hourly volume in order to get your daily and hourly earnings. I hope this article proves valuable to all of the financial planners out there who want to know exactly how much they are going to make before they even get started!

Unfortunately though, poker doesn't actually work this way.

Your time would be much better spent simply forgetting about all of your future riches for months at the very least. You should instead focus on playing as much as you can and working hard on your game away from the tables. You should aim to develop the work ethic, discipline, emotional control and dedication to continued learning that are all necessary for long term success in this game.

I am not here to encourage the dreamers who send me these emails asking about how much they are going to make. These are the people who are all but guaranteed to fail in this game.

I am here however to encourage realistic people with the hunger to learn and improve to go pursue their passion for this game. People with no ego who want to earn it like the guy who I interviewed in my last post. It's fine to have big dreams in this game but put that aside for now. It is time to get to work.

Please like and share this article below on Facebook and Twitter if you found it useful!

Nathan Williams aka "BlackRain79" is a poker player, coach, DragTheBar instructor and the author of Crushing the Microstakes and Modern Small Stakes.

Wednesday, May 14, 2014

Interview with Rising Poker Talent Willian "KhalDragon" Mates

One of the great things about being so involved with poker over the years from both a playing and teaching perspective (and now living overseas amongst a ton of professional players as well) is that I have had the chance to meet a lot of talented people. I have been wanting to start doing a few more interviews on my blog here from time to time. I thought there was no better person to start with than Willian "KhalDragon" Mates.

He has been a friend of mine and a regular poster on my forum and at DragTheBar for nearly two years now. He also has had outstanding success rising through the ranks from the very lowest stakes online NLHE cash games to now knocking on the door of mid stakes. He is an example of what hard work and dedication can do for you even in today's supposedly "tough" games.

Without further ado.

Please tell us a bit about yourself.

Hello, my name is Willian Chaves Mates. I am 31 years old and from Brazil. I’m a production civil engineer. Currently I’m doing a master thesis on logistics and transportation. I have worked as a production manager in a factory and also have taught soil mechanics at the university.

How and when did you first get introduced to poker?

I think it was about 7 years ago, playing with friends but only for fun. Things were not serious back then, but I was very competitive as I always have been about almost everything that I get involved with. However, I did not play for real money or against more skilled opponents until much later.

What stakes did you start out at? Did you have success right away?

Online I played play money like 5 years ago. Just about two years ago I started playing on Pokerstars at the lowest stake level 0,01-0,02. That was exactly when I bought Crushing the Microstakes. I read it many times, made as many notes as I could, made lots of excel tables, and posted almost every day on BlackRain’s forum. Nathan I really gave you a lot of trouble back then!

[BR79: Haha, no worries! You were quite the prolific poster back then but it is a testament to your dedication to the game and why you have seen such great progress].

I had a tremendous amount of success right away easily getting about 20bb/100 playing at 0,01-0,02 over a sample of over 100k hands. I remember being on vacation on my second or third month after reading CTM and I was able to have a 600 USD month playing 0,02-0,05. It was about July. In December of the same year (2012) I had a 1k+ month playing 0,10-,25. It was part time and I was not sure of how far I wanted to go with poker. Actually I kind of stopped for a while after that but I saw the possibility of making some real money playing this game.

What stakes do you play at now? What was the journey like for you to get to this point?

I’m playing a mix of 0,5-1 and 1-2 right now. Well from the point that I stopped in the last question, I had almost no poker activity in 2013 until July. By the end of June my contract with the university ended and sadly it could not be renewed. However, I had some savings for the upcoming months and a lot of free time. So I remembered that I had some success with poker in the previous year and decided to take another shot, a more serious one.

I only had 200 USD in my bankroll at this moment (previously cashed out all the rest) so I decided to play 0,05-0,1 full ring, and played only this game, since that has always been my best game. In one month I managed to get a healthy enough bankroll to play 0,1-0,25 so I moved up. I proceeded to play at this level and a few months after that moved to the next level. I think it is important to note that I played no SnG, no MTT and almost zero short-handed, I kept focused on full ring cash games.

December came and again a huge boom. There was a huge volume of deep stack games, lots of fish and I ran incredibly well. I ended up over 5k USD in earnings on the month, which was huge for me. The beginning of 2014 was not so good. I bought a nice car and overall increased my expenses a little bit but then I fell ill a couple times. I also had some bad runs (actually I think I played bad, both because of being sick and because of having some new money pressure).

So although I had some really good results instead of moving up I was indeed going to move down. At that point I had a conversation with Paul Ratchford, an incredibly skilled high stakes pro, and he told me that my skill was far greater than the level I was playing and it would be a huge waste of time if I moved down. So he mentioned Staking Pros, a site which is run by Hunter Bick, the CEO of DragTheBar. They have been kind of my home for poker. It is for sure the place where I learned the most in the past years. I had a conversation with Hunter and we started a staking arrangement where I would play at 0,5-1 and we agreed that if I manage to get good results then I would quickly move up to 1-2. That is exactly the point where I’m at now.

[BR79: Here are some recent graphs that Willian posted on his blog that show just how dominant he has been at the tables. First one is mostly NL50 near the start of this year. Second one is NL100 from last month, April].

Interview with rising poker talent Willian Mates
Interview with rising poker talent Khaldragon
Do you have any advice for people just starting out in poker or who are currently struggling at the lowest limits?

I think that people should realize how important focus is. People that really want to go to the next level should probably focus on a single game and commit to it. Playing less tables is also something to consider. By reducing the number of tables not only the focus on each table will increase but the game selection will improve drastically since you will be playing less marginal tables. What you will essentially be doing is trading those extra marginal tables for focus on the really profitable ones.

Do you have a blog or any social media accounts where the readers can follow your progress?

I have recently started a blog at www.khaldragon.blogspot.com.br. It is kind of new but I plan on doing two posts per week, both talking about my struggles at the new levels and about the strategies that I’m using. You can also find me on Twitter here.
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I want to thank Willian Mates for taking the time to do this interview for the readers here at blackrain79.com. I think the sky is the limit for this guy and once again he is a perfect example of where you can get with dedication and focus in this game. I would encourage all readers to go check out his blog. I am subscribed and looking forward to reading all of his future posts!

If you have any questions for Willian please leave them below or ask him directly on his blog. Also let me know if you like seeing interviews like this and want to see more!
Nathan Williams aka "BlackRain79" is a poker player, coach, DragTheBar instructor and the author of Crushing the Microstakes and Modern Small Stakes.


Wednesday, April 16, 2014

The Professional Poker Player Lifestyle

the lifestyle of a professional poker player.
It isn't this!
Many people picture the professional poker player lifestyle as one of fame, riches, Bentleys and private jets. Maybe for a handful of live players running really good in tournaments of late. Or for another handful of nosebleed online players who are at the top right now. But this is just not the reality for the vast, overwhelming majority of people who play this game for a living or as a side income.

Their poker lifestyle is one that you are probably more familiar with from your own day to day life. It is one of hard work, sacrifice and commitment. Sure, there is the freedom to set your own schedule that comes along with being a professional poker player but be careful what you wish for in this regard. Many people use this as their ticket to just be lazy all day. I know this because I did it myself for many years! Make no mistake you have to put in the work if you want success in this game and a lot of that work is actually done away from the poker tables.

Winning at poker does not just revolve around the decisions that you make once you sit down at the tables. How you manage your life away from the tables can actually have a much bigger impact on your results than you might think. I think there is a changing of the guard coming with online poker players at least. It is a very competitive environment these days and the best know that you can no longer half ass it and expect great results.

Work Ethic

First off, everything starts with work ethic. If you can't get yourself to sit down and play each day (or at least most days) then you are never going to make it in this game. Playing poker professionally or semi-professionally requires dedication and the ability to play even when you don't feel like it. And there will be many days when you don't feel like it for a variety of different reasons. You have to be able to cut through all that and get yourself going.

Eric Thomas (a now famous motivational speaker who I have followed for years) likes to talk about just showing up. Just showing up is half the battle. Many people "go pro" and think that they will love playing every day forever. It will be so easy. Wait until you hit that 100k+ hand soul ripping downswing. Then tell me how much you feel like playing. Wait until you are burnt out from months or years on end of mass multi-tabling and the new Call of Duty has just been released.

You are your own boss and you need to be able to force yourself to show up on these days. Just because you have this "freedom" to determine your own hours does not mean that you get a license to abuse it. You would never do this at any regular job and it needs to be the same with poker. 

Make Time for Regular Play

If poker is a serious part time or full time pursuit to you then it needs to come first before anything. One of the best ways to help yourself in this regard is to set a regular schedule each day for when you play. I find that my mind is the sharpest in the morning and I also live in Asia and so that is when the games are the best. So I tend to simply schedule my poker sessions for first thing in the morning. Some people are different and prefer midday or nights though. It doesn't matter, just set a schedule and stick to it.

Make Time for Regular Study

I recently talked about how to conduct a poker session review and a database review. You need to schedule time for these each week as well. I prefer to make some time for each of these in the afternoon on weekends. I will review hands or entire sessions from the previous week and look into ways to improve my overall game. During a couple of week nights I will make time to watch and take notes on a training video, read and take notes on a poker book or catch up on some poker strategy forums and post hands. 

Taking Care of You

Poker is not like a regular job. You can't just show up and run through a bunch of mundane tasks that you were told to do while checking Facebook. Poker requires constant focus and attention to detail. It requires you to be mentally sharp and prepared at all times. In order to consistently be in this state we need to work harder than most people on taking care of our mind and body. This is an area that I think a fair number of elite level serious online grinders are starting to wake up to. However, the large majority are still woefully inadequate.

Being prepared both physically and mentally requires three things above all else: a healthy diet, regular exercise and a good nights sleep. I don't want to go too much into detail on any of these because you have probably heard it all before, but I can tell you from firsthand experience that this stuff really does work! So I will have a bit to say.

Eat for Performance

First off, simply don't allow yourself to buy crap at the grocery store or market. If you load up your fridge with fruits, vegetables, whole grains and lean meats then that is what you will eat. Secondly, cut out the fast food and soda drinks completely. Nobody serious about their life in general (let alone poker) needs to be eating that garbage. There are plenty of healthy options out there if you are in a rush that does not include a big mac, fries and a sugar bomb drink.

We all enjoy eating. It is one of life's greatest pleasures but you have to remember that what we eat affects us deeply on so many levels, especially mentally. In a game like poker that requires multi-tasking, fast and accurate decision making and steady emotions neglecting this area is just crazy. I choose to eat for performance in life for the most part. This doesn't mean that I don't occasionally "cheat" and have some pizza or ice cream but it is very rare. Remember that these are momentary pleasures. My health, the clarity of my mind and achieving my goals in life and at the poker table are much more important.

Get Active

Regular exercise is another big key. I know from meeting a lot of poker players here in Thailand that many of them workout and/or do cardio regularly. I have also done this for years and the benefits are just huge. The biggest key is getting yourself to do something that you like. I am a naturally athletic person so this is not difficult for me but I know that plenty of people just don't like to do physical things that much. Well, there must be something that you enjoy doing!

How about joining a rowing club and being out on a beautiful lake early in the morning while getting some exercise? How about hitting the pool more often? Who doesn't like swimming? How about buying some cheap tennis rackets and learning how to play with a friend? One of my personal favorites is mountain biking. Descending down a beautiful mountainside and breathing in that fresh crisp air can be an awe-inspiring experience. The key thing is to just get out there and do something that you enjoy and then it won't seem like work to you. Getting in shape does not require endless hours on a treadmill.

Get Enough Sleep

I am pretty bad at this one I must admit. And I know that a lot of people suffer from some form of insomnia at least once in awhile. I think the key is just learning how to shut your brain off. I know that this is my biggest problem when lying awake at night. Some things that help me hit the mental off switch are to meditate before bed, take a hot shower or read a boring but useful book.

Poker is a Business

From the above it might seem that the poker lifestyle is a bit on the boring side. What happened to all of the partying at the hottest clubs and sipping cocktails on exotic beaches all day? Well, the lifestyle of your typical online poker professional is a lot different from this in reality. Don't get me wrong, there is a time and a place to go a little bit wild but if you really want to get real results in this game then you need to treat it like a business.

The real truth about being a professional poker player is that it is a lot of hard work and sacrifice. This is why so many people try it and fail. They only think about the freedom part. They forget that it entails just as much responsibility (way more in my opinion actually) than a regular job especially if you want to be highly successful.

I just hit the 7 year anniversary of when I quit my last "real job" but believe me it has not been all roses and sunshine. It took me years to start taking this game as seriously as I should and start putting in the work. I scraped by in those early years but I could have accomplished so much more.

Having big dreams about poker is great. The are many awesome things about playing poker professionally that I didn't even get a chance to touch on in this article. I am so happy and blessed to have found this game. But understand that this is also a very demanding job that most people are simply not cut out for. You really have to want it.

As they say, and no truer words were ever spoken about it, "poker is a hard way to make an easy living."

Let me know in the comments what the professional poker lifestyle means to you. Please "Like" or "Tweet" this article below if you found it useful!
Nathan Williams aka "BlackRain79" is a poker player, coach, DragTheBar instructor and the author of Crushing the Microstakes and Modern Small Stakes.